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The Development and Implementation of the MCM

  • Jacobus Gideon (Kobus) MareeEmail author
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Abstract

This chapter begins by discussing the continued use of test scores in career counseling in conjunction with people’s “stories”. It examines the value of drawing on self-estimates of interests and confidence about aptitude for certain careers. It stresses the importance of using a combination of factors to predict career success and elaborates on various factors in the development and standardization of the MCM. The conceptual framework of the instrument and some aspects of its psychometric properties are dealt with in the final section of the chapter.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Educational PsychologyUniversity of PretoriaPretoriaSouth Africa

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