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Outcomes in DCD Liver Transplantation

  • Andrea Schlegel
  • Rebecca Panconesi
  • Paolo MuiesanEmail author
Chapter
  • 13 Downloads

Abstract

Within the last decade, liver transplantation from DCD donors has gained interest and outcomes have improved, mainly due to an increased awareness of the overall risk and subsequent selection policy. Although most countries have steadily pushed their donor risk factor boundaries, the overall utilization rate of DCD livers remains suboptimal. The repeat occurrences of DCD-specific complications, difficult to reduce further, are highlighted as one reason behind such advancement standstill, despite the continuous technical, medical, and anesthesiologic innovation.

This chapter highlights most outcome measures after DCD liver transplantation including graft and patient survival with a specific focus on biliary, vascular, and renal complications. Overall graft and donor risk is discussed in context of liver reperfusion injury and graft function with the development of specific complications. Finally, suggestions on how to assess and report outcomes in a more standardized and transparent way are provided to further improve our results in the future.

Keywords

Outcome Graft survival Risk factors Ischemic cholangiopathy Retransplantation 

Abbreviations

ALT

Alanine aminotransferase

AST

Aspartate aminotransferase

AUC

Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve statistic

BAR score

Balance of risk score

BMI

Body mass index

CIT

Cold ischemia time

CVA

Cerebrovascular accident

DAA

Direct-acting antiviral medications

DBD

Donation after brain death

DCD

Donation after circulatory death

DCD-RI

DCD-Risk Index

DM

Diabetes mellitus

DRI

Donor Risk Index

EAD

Early allograft dysfunction

ECMO

Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

ERCP

Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

fDWIT

functional donor warm ischemia time

GDA

Gastroduodenal artery

GGT

Gamma-glutamyl-transferase

HAS

Hepatic artery stenosis

HAT

Hepatic artery thrombosis

HBV

Hepatitis B virus

HCC

Hepatocellular carcinoma

HCV

Hepatitis C virus

HMP

Hypothermic machine perfusion

HOPE

Hypothermic oxygenated perfusion

IC

Ischemic cholangiopathy

ICU

Intensive care unit

IT

Implantation time

KCH

King’s College Hospital

MELD

Model of End Liver Disease

NHS

National Health Service

NHSBT

National Health Service Blood and Transplant

NMP

Normothermic machine perfusion

NRP

Normothermic regional perfusion

OLT

Orthotopic liver transplantation

PNF

Primary nonfunction

PTC

Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography

ROS

Reactive oxygen species

UHB

University Hospitals Birmingham

UK

United Kingdom

UK-DCD-Risk Score

United Kingdom Donation After Circulatory Death Risk Score

UKELD

United Kingdom Model of End-Stage Liver Disease

UNOS

United Network of Organ Sharing

USA

United States of America

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrea Schlegel
    • 1
  • Rebecca Panconesi
    • 2
  • Paolo Muiesan
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Liver Unit, Queen Elizabeth Hospital BirminghamBirmingham, West MidlandsUK
  2. 2.Liver Unit, Careggi University Hospital, FlorenceFlorenceItaly

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