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Clinical Applications of Skin Bank Bioproducts

  • Linda Tognetti
  • Ernesto DePiano
  • Roberto Perotti
  • Chiara Cencetti
  • Claudia Panzano
  • Federico Zerini
  • Gianmarco De Donato
  • Giancarlo Palasciano
  • Paolo Gennaro
  • Guido Lorenzini
  • Luca Griamldi
  • Elisa Pianigiani
  • Pietro Rubegni
Chapter
  • 20 Downloads

Abstract

Although the main field of application of homologous skin grafts from donor skin is extensive burns, they can be successfully used in a variety of critical and/or hard-to-heal wounds. Wound closure after post-traumatic injuries and/or localized at peculiar body sites (head and neck, oral cavity, lower legs) is particularly challenging and can often be delayed due to local and systemic factors (e.g., bacterial burden, infections, diabetic neuropathy, and pressure). In these cases, integrated medical-surgical approach based on the use of skin bank bioproducts, i.e., homologous skin and dermal grafts, should be considered. By acting as a physiological biological dressing and scaffold, these products add several advantages, such as pain control, protection of deep structures (e.g., tendons, bones, cartilage, and nerves), stimulation of a functional new dermis (rather than a scar) and of re-epithelization with a significant reduction in wound closure time.

Keywords

Homologous skin graft Lyophilized acellular dermis Hard-to-heal wounds 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linda Tognetti
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Ernesto DePiano
    • 1
  • Roberto Perotti
    • 1
  • Chiara Cencetti
    • 1
  • Claudia Panzano
    • 4
  • Federico Zerini
    • 5
  • Gianmarco De Donato
    • 4
  • Giancarlo Palasciano
    • 4
  • Paolo Gennaro
    • 5
  • Guido Lorenzini
    • 6
  • Luca Griamldi
    • 7
  • Elisa Pianigiani
    • 3
  • Pietro Rubegni
    • 1
  1. 1.Dermatology Division, Department of Medical, Surgical and Neuro-SciencesUniversity of SienaSienaItaly
  2. 2.Department of Medical BiotechnologiesUniversity of SienaSienaItaly
  3. 3.Skin Bank UnitUniversity Hospital of SienaSienaItaly
  4. 4.Department of Surgery, Vascular and Endovascular Surgery UnitUniversity of SienaSienaItaly
  5. 5.Maxillo-facial Surgery Division, Department of Medical, Surgical and Neuro-SciencesUniversity of SienaSienaItaly
  6. 6.Department of Dentistry and OphthalmologyUniversity of SienaSienaItaly
  7. 7.Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Unit, Department of Medicine, Surgery and NeuroscienceUniversity of SienaSienaItaly

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