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Adorno’s Philosophy of Literature: A Theory of Literary Interpretation

  • Mario Farina
Chapter
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Abstract

This chapter of the book is devoted to the definition of Adorno’s philosophy of literature as a complete theory of the literary work. My argument is that, in his definition of literature as a pivotal philosophical problem, Adorno develops a sort of processual determination of the work of art which is able to address the most contemporary questions in philosophy of literature: (a) the status of literature toward the other arts; (b) the question of the ontology and reality of a literary piece; (c) the notion of literary interpretation and the status of text in relation to the producer; (d) the distinctive position of the novel in the context of literature. According to this, Adorno’s aesthetics, conceived as a philosophy of literature, has the chance to show its potential as a consistent interpretation of contemporary status of art.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mario Farina
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Letters and PhilosophyUniversity of FlorenceFirenzeItaly

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