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Methodologies for Millimeter-Wave Circuit Design in Extreme Environments

  • Mladen BožanićEmail author
  • Saurabh Sinha
Chapter
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Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE, volume 658)

Abstract

In the previous four chapters, methodologies for the research, design and innovation in millimeter-wave circuits were presented in the context of regular environments. This means that the electronics of a typical transceiver researched up to this point in this book would typically operate in an environment where one would expect to find humans, plants and animals.

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Copyright information

© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of JohannesburgJohannesburgSouth Africa

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