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Enacting Solidarity

  • Rudi LaermansEmail author
Chapter
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Abstract

With the macro-, meso- and micro-level of social reality correspond different modes of solidarity, which partly explains the concept’s multidimensionality. This is illustrated though an analysis of three empirical studies.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.KU LeuvenLeuvenBelgium

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