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Understanding Students’ Online Behavior While They Search on the Internet: Searching as Learning

  • Roope Jaakonmäki
  • Jan vom Brocke
  • Stefan Dietze
  • Hendrik Drachsler
  • Albrecht Fortenbacher
  • René Helbig
  • Michael Kickmeier-Rust
  • Ivana Marenzi
  • Angel Suarez
  • Haeseon Yun
Chapter
  • 34 Downloads
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Business Process Management book series (BRIEFSBPM)

Abstract

Informal learning activities, like searching for information on the Internet, can enhance students’ learning. However, not everything we find on the Internet is factual. If teachers could understand where the students look for information during their course, they could help them improve the quality of their informal learning through the Internet. This recipe shows how to gain insights into students’ online searching behavior and to monitor their performance by using a collaborative learning environment which tracks students’ activities. This recipe is supported by a system that integrates a collaboration environment, a glossary tool, and an online tracking system, specifically created to meet the needs of teachers who teach translation and interpretation courses. Using this system, the teacher can take advantage of the dashboard visualizations to monitor students’ activities and identify cases of low commitment or misunderstanding of the task so they can provide individual support to the students who need it.

Keywords

LearnWeb Learning platform Log data analysis 

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roope Jaakonmäki
    • 1
  • Jan vom Brocke
    • 1
  • Stefan Dietze
    • 2
  • Hendrik Drachsler
    • 3
  • Albrecht Fortenbacher
    • 4
  • René Helbig
    • 4
  • Michael Kickmeier-Rust
    • 5
  • Ivana Marenzi
    • 6
  • Angel Suarez
    • 3
  • Haeseon Yun
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Information SystemsUniversity of LiechtensteinVaduzLiechtenstein
  2. 2.L3S Research CenterUniversity of HannoverHannoverGermany
  3. 3.Welten InstituteOpen University of the NetherlandsHeerlenThe Netherlands
  4. 4.School of Computing, Communication and BusinessHTW BerlinBerlinGermany
  5. 5.KTI - Knowledge Technologies InstituteGraz University of TechnologyGrazAustria
  6. 6.L3S Research CenterLeibniz University of HannoverHannoverGermany

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