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Victimology pp 185-212 | Cite as

Disablist Hate Crime: A Scar on the Conscience of the Criminal Justice System?

  • Jemma TysonEmail author
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Abstract

This chapter critically explores the complex issue of disablist hate crime and its relationship to the criminal justice system, predominantly in England and Wales. It begins with a consideration of definitions of disability and disablist hate crime, both in academic and legal terms. The extent, nature and impact of disablist victimisation are examined, and the complexities associated with each of these issues are discussed. The effects of these on the emergence of disablist hate crime as a political, legal, social and criminal justice problem are then considered, with a particular emphasis on the role of identity politics. The chapter then examines the current state of criminal justice responses and the inherent challenges faced by the agencies therein. Finally, suggested steps for the future are put forward by the author to improve the identification of and response to victims of disablist hate crime.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Criminal Justice Studies, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences University of PortsmouthPortsmouthUK

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