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The Dublin Intermediate Prison System

  • Emilie BerthillotEmail author
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Part of the Palgrave Studies in Prisons and Penology book series (PSIPP)

Abstract

The Dublin intermediate prison system proposes a comparative study of Dublin’s, Edinburgh’s and London’s prison systems in the nineteenth century. It aims at offering a new point of view about British and Irish jails by contradicting the widespread belief of English strictness and Irish leniency. Based on case studies, the article thus details the inner working of intermediate prisons, the unique Irish form of containment, and shows its severity and modernity when compared to the English penal system. Finally, the Jebb and Crofton controversy over the paternity of the new Irish Convict System is tackled, emphasizing on the jealousy aroused from the efficiency of the Irish system, the first one to propose such individualized sentences in the nineteenth century.

Keywords

Dublin London Edinburgh Prison Nineteenth century Irish Convict System 

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Web Resources

    Online Archives

    1. Wakefield Prison 1801–1991. West Yorkshire Archive Service, Wakefield, Reference GB 201 C000118. https://archiveshub.jisc.ac.uk/search/archives/69689709-cfcf-3daa-ba58-c08f4f4e10b9

    Online Articles

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Université de Lille, CECILLELilleFrance

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