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Transitional Justice Norms: the UN, Indonesia and the Netherlands

  • Pauline StoltzEmail author
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Part of the Memory Politics and Transitional Justice book series (MPTJ)

Abstract

This chapter introduces the background to the narratives about memories of the three violent conflicts that I analyse in the following chapters. I situate the three conflicts and the memory struggles in time, place and space by providing the political and legal contexts to relevant events between 1942 and 2015. Transitional justice aims to give voice to victims and is concerned with redress for past wrongdoings. Successive Indonesian and Dutch governments have contested global transitional justice norms, or have been reluctant to introduce relevant measures to address historical injustices related to the violent conflicts. Resistance to these denials of moral and political responsibility has been recurrent over the years and intensified in both Indonesia and the Netherlands during commemorations of the conflicts in 2015.

Keywords

Transitional justice Norms UN Indonesia the Netherlands 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Politics and SocietyAalborg UniversityAalborgDenmark

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