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Display the Invisible. Automated Algorithms to Visualize Complex Phenomena

  • Michele CalvanoEmail author
  • Michela Cirelli
  • Massimiliano Lo Turco
Conference paper
  • 200 Downloads
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 1140)

Abstract

The artworks collected in the museums are characterized by formal and invisible values. These latter ones are generated over time and derived mainly from the historical, artistic, social and media history that characterized the exhibited artworks; informal properties are as important as the formal values of the work. The weighted relationship between these values helps to create an attractive weight of the artwork within the exhibition project. Therefore, it is an interesting subject for a correct foreshadowing of visitor flows. We illustrate automated procedures to show, through graphics, the complex phenomena triggered by the attractive weight of the collections.

The elements involved in this research are the exhibition area (the graphic field), the collection (the attractive elements) and the users.

The conceived procedure, once automated, becomes a prototype to support the exhibitor to control the exhibition design and eventually make it more efficient if compared to the quality of the displayed collections.

Keywords

Parametric graphics Exhibition design Digital museums Interoperability Algorithmic approach 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michele Calvano
    • 1
    Email author
  • Michela Cirelli
    • 1
  • Massimiliano Lo Turco
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Architecture and Design (DAD)Politecnico di TorinoTurinItaly

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