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Discourse

  • Hannah ValenzuelaEmail author
Chapter
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Abstract

How do we put texts together, and how might that be changing? This chapter examines new forms of discourse in the twenty-first century and addresses the question about whether traditional boundaries between writing and speaking still have validity. A range of analytical tools are used for this: cohesion, coherence, register, and style, amongst others. Classroom strategies suggest ways to teach micro-level discourse analysis features such as deixis, as well as to encourage awareness and debate on the macro-level topics of change. The role of authentic material is considered in developing learners’ skills and language, and authentic texts are used throughout the chapter to exemplify discourse features and classroom strategies.

Keywords

Authentic texts Discourse analysis Conversation analysis Writtenness Spokenness 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of EducationUniversity of DerbyDerbyUK

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