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The Identity of Man – Winch Between Spinoza, Weil, and Wittgenstein

  • Sarah Tropper
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Part of the Nordic Wittgenstein Studies book series (NRWS, volume 6)

Abstract

Throughout his philosophical career, Peter Winch had a particular interest in the philosophy of Spinoza, as is evidenced not only by a variety of references on a diverse range of issues in his works, but also by several lectures and seminars he delivered on this thinker. A reconstruction of his interpretation of Spinoza’s system, which unites epistemological, metaphysical and ethical considerations as mutually dependent, brings to the fore Winch’s interest in the individual not only as an important epistemological, but equally as a moral agent, who is embedded in a web of circumstances that shape her view on the world and the possibilities and options she is able to entertain. Moreover, in his reading of Spinoza, the focus on the irreducibility of the individual’s standpoint is also connected to the philosophies of Wittgenstein and Simone Weil, a connection which adds at the same time an emphasis on a fundamental limitation of moral philosophy in general.

Keywords

Spinoza Simone Weil Wittgenstein Personal identity Metaphysics 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sarah Tropper
    • 1
  1. 1.Alpen-Adria-Universität KlagenfurtKlagenfurtAustria

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