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Expressionistic Chuanju: Ghosts and Scenography in Lady Macbeth

  • Wei Feng
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Abstract

This chapter deals with the change of scenography on the stage of intercultural xiqu. Despite its claim as a total theatre, xiqu seldom employed stage devices until the empty classical stage was replaced by the Western proscenium stage. Although filling the empty stage might undermine the fundamental aesthetics of xiqu, it could also enrich xiqu’s theatricality by incorporating more code systems. This chapter analyses the chuanju Makebai Furen (Lady Macbeth, 2003) which attempts to infuse Western Expressionism into chuanju’s conventions to externalize characters’ sophisticated psychology (if not emotion)—an element long absent or underdeveloped in traditional Chinese theatre. The invisible psychology of Lady Macbeth in the original texts will be shown and enacted with an affective fusion of Chinese and Western techniques, particularly music, voice, light, stage devices, costume, and presentation of performers’ bodies.

Keywords

Expressionism Light bangqiang Psychology The symbolic 

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Wei Feng
    • 1
  1. 1.Shandong UniversityShandongChina

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