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Student Engagement Through Community Building

Making the Case for a Team-Based Approach to Learning Physics
  • Teresa L. LarkinEmail author
Conference paper
  • 24 Downloads
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 1134)

Abstract

This paper provides an overview of a team-based approach to learning physics in a second-level course for non-majors entitled Light, Sound, Action (LSA) taught at XX University. Designed using a workshop format, LSA provides students numerous opportunities to learn physics using a number of interactive engagement strategies. These interactive engagement strategies provide the backbone for the structure of the course. Using a carefully crafted set of collaborative activities, students in LSA engage in a wide range of experiences in a team setting. Within these collaborative activities are strategies aimed at enhancing communication and building community within the classroom. Perceptions about the team-based collaborative activities in LSA will be presented based on the responses to a short survey sent to students who have taken the course in the past three years. One emergent theme based on these results is that the community-building, team-based activities used in LSA can serve to transcend the classroom experience and carry over into other domains.

Keywords

Building community in the classroom Collaborative learning Interactive engagement strategies Team-building in physics Workshop Physics 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PhysicsAmerican UniversityWashington, DCUSA

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