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On the Emerging Area of Biocybersecurity and Relevant Considerations

  • Xavier-Lewis Palmer
  • Lucas Potter
  • Saltuk KarahanEmail author
Conference paper
  • 5 Downloads
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 1130)

Abstract

Biocybersecurity is a novel space for the 21st century that meets our innovations in biotechnology and computing head on. Within this space, many considerations are open for and demand consideration as groups endeavor to develop products and policies that adequately ensure asset management and protection. Herein, simplified and brief exploration is given followed by some surface discussion of impacts. These impacts concern the end user, ethical and legal considerations, international proceedings, business, and limitations. It is hoped that this will be helpful in future considerations towards biocybersecurity policy developments and implementations.

Keywords

Bio Biocybersecurity Cyberbiosecurity Security Bio-Security 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xavier-Lewis Palmer
    • 1
  • Lucas Potter
    • 1
  • Saltuk Karahan
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Biomedical Engineering Institute, Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringOld Dominion UniversityNorfolkUSA
  2. 2.Department of Political Science and GeographyOld Dominion UniversityNorfolkUSA

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