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A Cartography of Appetites

  • Jacinthe FloreEmail author
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Abstract

This chapter introduces readers to A Genealogy of Appetite in the Sexual Sciences, which examines key “moments” in the pathologisation of sexuality, and demonstrates how medical techniques assumed critical roles in shaping modern understandings of the problem of appetite. It examines how techniques of the patient case history, elixirs and devices, measurement, diagnostic manuals and pharmaceuticals were central to the medicalisation of sexual appetite. Histories of sexuality have predominantly focused on the emergence of sexual identities and categories of desire. They have marginalised questions of excess and lack, the appearance of a libido that dwindles or intensifies, which became a pathological object in Europe by the nineteenth century. Through a genealogical method that draws on the writings of Michel Foucault, the chapter highlights the pronounced focus on questions of object choice in histories of sexuality while delineating an approach to the history of sexual appetite in psychiatric discourse.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Royal Melbourne Institute of TechnologyMelbourneAustralia

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