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After Yugoslavia: The New World

  • Arianna Piacentini
Chapter
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Abstract

By retaining a temporal perspective, this chapter goes in depth in the current Bosnian and Macedonian realities. It analyses how both states’ consociational arrangements, distributions of power among the political elites, and networks of alliances between rulers and ruled, have possibly concurred to tailor ethnopolitical systems legitimizing (ethnic) identity politics. In order to prepare the ground for the inter-generational analysis, the chapter also explores those dynamics potentially affecting and shaping citizens’ socio-political behaviours and, in turn, the meanings attributed to, and the functions assumed by, ethnonational origins.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arianna Piacentini
    • 1
  1. 1.Eurac ResearchBolzanoItaly

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