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International Student Assessment: Aims, Approaches and Challenges

  • Miyako IkedaEmail author
  • Alfonso Echazarra
Chapter
  • 54 Downloads

Abstract

Conducting international student assessments requires clear target aims, precise methodology, and careful coordination of survey construction, data collection, analysis and reporting mechanisms. This chapter outlines the aims and approaches of the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) undertaken by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), highlighting similarities and differences compared with assessments conducted by the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA). It describes the manner in which these international student assessments have helped steer policy dialogue and decisions at the international and regional levels. It concludes with a critical review of current approaches and practices in light of future possibilities, especially in view of future student monitoring.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Organisation for Economic Co-operation and DevelopmentParisFrance

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