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International Assessment Studies in Serbia Between Traditional Solutions, Unexpected Achievements and High Expectations

  • Dragica Pavlović BabićEmail author
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Abstract

Since 2001, Serbia has been participating in IEA/TIMSS (grade 4, starting from 2011) and OECD/PISA. During this period, assessment context was characterized by the highly centralized and over-controlled system with content-based curricula and traditional teaching methods which set students in a passive position with general expectations placed on the level of literate reproduction of the poorly integrated facts, underdeveloped assessment system and lack of the assessment data. International assessment studies revealed that achievements were disappointingly low and statistically below the international average in all examined domains with a high percentage of students below the level of functional literacy and a very small percantege of them on the highest proficiency levels. But, at the same time, the equity is pretty high and slightly above the OECD average; the younger students (grade 4) performed better than their peers, with the achievement over the international average; progress of about one half of the standard deviation in reading literacy is made, which is further discussed in detail. So far, assessment data have influenced some legal and strategic solutions, but have not made any visible influence on the curricula, teaching methodology, assessment practice in school and in-service teacher education.

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© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of BelgradeBelgradeSerbia

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