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Blended Learning Approach in English Language Teaching – Its Benefits, Challenges, and Perspectives

  • Blanka KlímováEmail author
  • Marcel Pikhart
Conference paper
  • 6 Downloads
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 11984)

Abstract

At present, blended learning (BL) is commonly used in majority of the institutions of higher learning since it appears to have a positive impact on student learning outcomes and brings a number of benefits for the whole educational process. This is also true for English language teaching (ELT). In ELT, the BL approach offers more opportunities for exposure, discovery, and use of target language. In addition, the BL approach is especially suitable for distant students, who due to their work commitment cannot be involved in full-time English language study. However, recently there has been a shift from the online courses used as counterparts to traditional instruction in the BL approach towards the use of mobile applications. The findings show that such a BL approach (i.e., a combination of mobile learning via mobile applications and traditional instruction) is particularly effective in vocabulary learning. However, such an approach demands even more rigorous teaching methods and strategies, as well as a more elaborate and meaningful context within which learning can take place. Therefore, future research should focus on the exploration of effectiveness of this new BL approach.

Keywords

Blended learning Traditional instruction Mobile learning English Students Benefits 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study is supported by the IGS project 2019, run at the Faculty of Informatics and Management, University of Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Applied Linguistics, Faculty of Informatics and ManagementUniversity of Hradec KraloveHradec KraloveCzech Republic

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