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Transforming Shame in the Workplace, Leadership and Organisation: Contributions of Positive Psychology Movements to the Discourse

  • Claude-Hélène Mayer
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Part of the Management for Professionals book series (MANAGPROF)

Abstract

In the twenty-first-century workforce, shame seems to be an often unconscious and neglected topic which is hardly addressed on micro-, meso- and macro-levels in different cultural contexts. Shame is generally viewed as a negative emotion which impacts negatively on the self within the context of others. Previous research has shown that shame affects individuals in organisations and needs to be addressed and transformed to impact constructively on leaders, employees and the organisation. This chapter presents an overview on relevant aspects of shame in the workplace and places it into the discourse of positive psychology (1.0) and the second wave of positive psychology (2.0).

Keywords

Shame Leaders Workplace Organisation Transforming negative emotions Health resource Workplace health Positive psychology (1.0) Positive psychology wave two (2.0) 

Notes

Acknowledgements

I would like to thank the global community of Positive Psychology scholars for their contributions and particularly Professor Paul P.T. Wong, Toronto, Canada, for advancing the field.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Claude-Hélène Mayer
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Industrial Psychology and People ManagementUniversity of JohannesburgJohannesburgSouth Africa
  2. 2.Institut für Therapeutische KommunikationEuropa-Universität ViadrinaFrankfurt (Oder)Germany

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