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Design of a Multi-link Suspension for Motorcycles with a Sidecar

  • Jakub TobolářEmail author
Conference paper
  • 5 Downloads
Part of the Lecture Notes in Mechanical Engineering book series (LNME)

Abstract

For motorcycles, various suspension concepts for the front steerable wheel have been developed over decades. Even if the telescopic front fork has been eventually established as a common design, other alternative designs are still being evolved. A design of such an alternative - a multi-link suspension, particularly utilised for motorcycles with a sidecar, is discussed in the present paper. Beside some modelling aspects, optimisation of suspension’s kinematics and benefits of an asymmetric layout for left and right cornering are elaborated.

Keywords

Motorcycle Multi-link suspension Modelling 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.German Aerospace Center (DLR)Institute of System Dynamics and ControlWesslingGermany

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