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Research Writing: Tips and Common Errors

  • Leonie Munro
  • Aarthi Ramlaul
Chapter
  • 15 Downloads

Abstract

Academic writing should be precise and objective. It should not include jargon, circumlocution, tautology, or clichés. Effective academic writing requires the use of good grammar, a logical structure, precise verb and word choice, and information. Each paragraph has a single theme that is developed in several connecting sentences. Punctuation is important in academic writing. Examples are provided to highlight what is required in academic writing.

Keywords

Proposal Grammar Verbs Punctuation Definite article Capitalization Reference system Plagiarism Circumlocution Tautology 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leonie Munro
    • 1
  • Aarthi Ramlaul
    • 2
  1. 1.Formerly School of RadiographyKing Edward VIII HospitalDurbanSouth Africa
  2. 2.Diagnostic Radiography and Imaging, School of Health and Social WorkUniversity of HertfordshireHatfieldUK

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