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Demographic Components of Aging in the Nonmetropolitan U.S., 1980–2017

  • John CromartieEmail author
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Part of the National Symposium on Family Issues book series (NSFI, volume 10)

Abstract

Aging is one of the transformational trends of the twenty-first century, and rural spaces in the United States and across the globe are in the vanguard of current aging trends. With the aging of the baby boom past 65 starting in 2011, we have entered an unprecedented period of rapid aging. What motivates the research presented here is that rural aging happens for very different reasons in very different places. The same outcome at the local level—a higher proportion of people in older age groups—can result from contrasting demographic trends. Here, I explore variation in the demographic causes of aging across nonmetropolitan areas as a whole and in six nonmetropolitan case study regions over four decades, 1980–2017. Findings show rapid expansion in the number of older age counties in the United States since 2010 in regions with different socioeconomic profiles than in previously aging regions.

Keywords

Population aging Aging in place Aging trends Rural aging Causes of aging Older age counties Aging regions Demographic transition Aging in nonmetropolitan United States County-level aging Geography of aging Nonmetro older age Young-adult out-migration 

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Copyright information

© This is a U.S. government work and not under copyright protection in the U.S.; foreign copyright protection may apply 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.United States Department of AgricultureEconomic Research ServiceKansas CityUSA

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