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Experience

  • Roberto Gronda
Chapter
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Part of the Synthese Library book series (SYLI, volume 421)

Abstract

This chapter is preliminary. My aim is to frame Dewey’s philosophy of science in the wider context of his notion of experience. Dewey’s account of experience has posed serious difficulties to his interpreters. My proposal is irenic: I take Dewey’s experience to be a function performed by living beings who have the capacity to master the use of language. I focus on the metaphilosophical use that Dewey makes of the notion of experience thus understood, showing that such notion is introduced to account for the plurality of activities or life-behaviors in which human beings are engaged.

Keywords

Experience Semantic identity thesis (SIT) Life-behavior Infinity words Method Empiricism Primary/secondary experience Science and common sense Experience had/experience known Cognitive/non-cognitive experience 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roberto Gronda
    • 1
  1. 1.Dipartimento di Civiltà e Forme del SapereUniversità di PisaPisaItaly

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