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Mid Term Field Validation of the MONICA Air Quality Multisensor

  • E. EspositoEmail author
  • S. De Vito
  • F. Formisano
  • E. Massera
  • G. Fattoruso
  • G. Migliaccio
  • P. D’Auria
  • A. Amendola
  • G. Di Francia
Conference paper
  • 51 Downloads
Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE, volume 629)

Abstract

Accurate sensors validation is a fundamental requirement in air quality monitoring. Validated multisensor could in fact be used as tools to provide indicative measurements to compliment data coming from regulatory monitoring stations. The sparseness of the conventional analyzers, do not allow to have a dense background and prevent the possibility to achieve a high resolution picture of pollutants concentrations in cities and validated Air Quality multisensor could provide a solution to the lack of resolution. Currently, the most accredited validation procedure involves in field data recording in co-location with reference instrumentation. In this work, we show the results of a validation experiment implemented co-locating the ENEA MONICA platform together with an ARPAC (Campania Regional Agency for Environmental Protection) conventional analyzer, during 8 months. The obtained results encourage the possible use of MONICA multisensor platform as a backup tool for reference analyzers.

Keywords

Air quality multisensor systems Reference backup data Field calibration 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Esposito
    • 1
    Email author
  • S. De Vito
    • 1
  • F. Formisano
    • 1
  • E. Massera
    • 1
  • G. Fattoruso
    • 1
  • G. Migliaccio
    • 1
  • P. D’Auria
    • 2
  • A. Amendola
    • 3
  • G. Di Francia
    • 1
  1. 1.ENEA, DTE-FSD-SAFS, Research Centre PorticiNaplesItaly
  2. 2.ARPAC—Regional Agency for Environmental ProtectionCampaniaItaly
  3. 3.SITE s.r.l.—Sicurezza TErritorio, Centro Direzionale di NapoliNaplesItaly

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