Advertisement

An Assessment of the Impacts of Climate Change on African Catfish Fingerling (Clarias gariepinus Burchell, 1822)

  • Jude AwokeEmail author
  • Johnny Ogunji
Chapter
  • 13 Downloads
Part of the Climate Change Management book series (CCM)

Abstract

Climate change standard forecasts have heightened incidence of severe weather actions like floods and protracted famine. This in effect increases periodic volume of water level fluctuation in lentic water bodies thereby altering their natural composition. Too much water level variation is projected to have more serious effect on the morphology, role and biodiversity of marshy localities than effects due to increase in temperature due to change in climate pattern. This study was undertaken, to unravel specific areas and extent of water level effects on fishes. It is specifically targeted at assessing the effect of water levels on Clarias gariepinus fingerlings. The results will be useful for aquaculture as adaptation strategies are needed to contain the effect of water level fluctuation in the wild. A total of 180 Clarias gariepinus fingerlings were randomly distributed into 18-plastic tanks at 10-fish per tank for a 56-day growth trial. Growth performance, haematology and carcass composition were assessed at the end of the experiment. Results showed a significant difference (P > 0.05) in mean weight gain of fishes reared at varying water levels. The packed cell volume, red blood cell; mean corpuscular haemoglobin and corpuscular volume also showed significant differences (P > 0.05). Results indicate that water level variation has significant effect on haematology, growth and survival of Clarias gariepinus fingerlings. These results highlight the vulnerability of fish, especially Clarias gariepinus in the face of climate change.

Keywords

Greenhouse Global warming Climate change Fingerlings Carcass composition 

References

  1. Abrahams C (2008) Climate change and lakeshore conservation: a model and review of management techniques. Hydrobiologia 613:33–43.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s10750-008-9470-5CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Adedeji OB, Adegbite AF (2011) Comparative haematological parameters of the Bagrid catfish (Chrysichthys nigrodigitatus) and African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) from Asejire Dam Southwestern Nigeria. J Appl Sci Res 7(7):1042–1046Google Scholar
  3. Akinrotimi OA, Uedeme-Naa B, Agokei EO (2010) Effects of acclimation on haematological parameters of Tilapia guineensis (Bleeker, 1862). Sci World J 5 (4):1–4Google Scholar
  4. Alfieri L, Bisselink B, Dottori F, Naumann G, Wyser K, Feyen L, de Roo A (2017) Global projections of river flood risk in a warmer world. Earth’s Future 5:171–182CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Arnell NW, Gosling SN (2016) The impacts of climate change on river flood risk at the global scale. Clim Change 134:387–401CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Association of Official Analytical Chemists International (AOAC) (2000) Official methods of analysis, 17th edn. AOAC International, Gaithersburg, MD, USAGoogle Scholar
  7. Audu BS, Adamu KM, Nonyelu ON (2014) Changes in haematological parameters of Clarias gariepinus exposed to century plant (Agave americana) leaf dust. Int J App Bio Res 6(1):54–65Google Scholar
  8. Blaxhall J, Daibley S (1973) Routine hematology methods for use with fish blood. J fish Bio 5:771–781.  https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8649.1973.tb04510.xCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Bond NR, Lake PS Arthington AH (2008) The impacts of drought on freshwater ecosystems: an Australian perspective. Hydrobiologia 600:3–16Google Scholar
  10. Cnaani A (2006) Genetic perspective on stress and disease resistance in Aquaculture. Isr J Aqua Bamidgeh 58:375–383Google Scholar
  11. Coops H, Hosper SH (2002) Water-level management as a tool for the restoration of shallow lakes in the Netherlands. Lake Res Man 18(4):293–298CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Dacie JV, Lewis SM (2001) Practical Haematology 9th edn. Churchill Livingstone, London. p 633Google Scholar
  13. De Silva SS, Anderson TA (1995) Fish nutrition in aquaculture. Chapman and Hall, London, p 31Google Scholar
  14. Dienye HE, Olumuji OK (2014) Growth performance and haematological responses of African mud catfish Clarias gariepinus fed dietary levels of Moringa oleifera leaf meal. Net J Agri Sci 2(2):79–88Google Scholar
  15. Ebonyi Government (2019) Ebonyi state profile. http://www.ebonyistate.gov.ng/profile.aspx. Retrieved 6/3/19
  16. EPA—United States Environmental Protection Agency (2010) Climate change and society. https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc949667/m2/1/high_res_d/Climate_Change_Society.pdf. Retrieved 6/3/19
  17. Etim L, Lebo PE, King RP (1999) The dynamics of an exploited population of Siluroid Catfish (Schilbe Intermedius Ruppell, 1832) in the Cross River. Nig Fish Res 40:295–307CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Fagbenro O, Adedire CO, Ayotunde EO, Faminu EO (2000) Haematological profile, food consumption and enzyme assay in the gut of the African bony–tongue fish Heterotis niloticus (clupisudis) (Cuvier 1829) (Osteoglossidae). Trop Zoo 13:1–9CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Fasakin EA, Balogun AM, Ajayi OO (2003) Nutrition implication of processed maggot meals; hydrolysed, defatted, full-fat, sun-dried and oven dried in the diets of Clarias gariepinus fingerlings. Aqua Res 9(34):733–738CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Gross R, Gliwitzki M, Gross P, Klaus F (1996) Food and nutrition. Bulletin 17(1). http://archive.unu.edu/unupress/food/8F171e/8F171E00.htm. Retrieved 6/1/19
  21. Hulme PE (2005) Adapting to climate change: is there scope for ecological management in the face of a global threat? J App Ecol 42(5):784–794CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Idowu EO, Afolayan EB (2013) The effects of supplementing of fish meal with maggots at varying levels in the diet of Clarias gariepinus. Int Arc App Sci Tech 4(4):41–47Google Scholar
  23. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) (2007) Climate change 2007: synthesis report. In: Pauchauri RK, Reisinger A (eds) Contribution of working groups I, II, and III to the fourth intergovernmental panel on climate change. IPCC, Geneva, Switzerland. https://www.ipcc.ch/site/assets/uploads/2018/02/ar4_syr_full_report.pdf Retrieved 02/7/2019
  24. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) (2013) Climate chance 2013. The physical science basis. In: Stocker TF, Qin D, Plattner GK, Tignor M, Allen SK, Boschung J, Nuells A, Xia Y, Bex V, Midgley PM (eds) Contribution of working group I to the fifth assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change. Cambridge University Press, New York, pp 255–317Google Scholar
  25. Magawata I, Ipinjolu JK (2014) Climate change: mitigation and adaptation strategies in fisheries and aquaculture in Nigeria. J Aquatic Sci 9(4):257–261Google Scholar
  26. Magnuson JJ, Webster KE, Assel RA, Bowser CJ, Dillon PJ, Eaton JG, Evans HE, Fee EJ, Hall RI, Mortsch LR (1997) Potential effects of climate changes on aquatic systems: Laurentian Great Lakes and precambrian shield region. Hydrol Process 11(8):825–871CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Mugo-Bundi J, Oyoo-Okoth E, Ngugi CC, Manguya-Lusega D, Rasowo J, Chepkirui-Boit V (2013) Utilization of Caridina nilotica (Roux) meal as a protein ingredient in feeds for Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) Aqua Res 2:1–12Google Scholar
  28. Mulcahy MF (1970) Blood values in the pike, Esox lucius (L.). J Fish Bio 2:203–209CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. National Agricultural Extension and Research Liaison Services (NAERLS) (1996) Water quality management in fish culture. Extension bulletin no. 98 Fisheries series no. 3Google Scholar
  30. Nlewadim AA, Udoh JP, Aniekan JO (2011) Growth response and survival of Heterobranchus longifilis cultured at different water levels in outdoor concrete tanks. AACL Bioflux 4(3):404–411. http://www.bioflux.com.ro/aacl
  31. Obasa SO, Alegbeleye WO, Akinyemi AA, Idowu AA, Bamidele NA, Adesanya AN (2013) Replacement of maize meal by toasted African breadfruit (Treculia africana) seed meal in the diet of Clarias gariepinus (Burchell 1822) fingerlings. Livestock Res Rural Dev 25(108). Retrieved 21 Nov 2015, from http://www.lrrd.org/lrrd25/6/obas25108.htm
  32. Ofomata GEK (1995) Nigeria in maps: Eastern states. In: Ofomata GEK (ed) Ethiopic Publishing Cooperation, Benin, City, pp 14Google Scholar
  33. Ogunji JO, Nimptsch J, Wiegand C, Schulz C (2007) Evaluation of the influence of Housefly maggot meal (Magmeal) diets on Catalase, Glutahione, S-Transferase and Glycogen concentration of the liver of Oreochromis niloticus fingerling. Comp Biochem Physiol Part A 20(147):942–947CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Ogunji JO, Kloas W, Wirth M, Schulz C, Rennert B (2008) Housefly maggot meal (Magmeal) as a protein source for Oreocromis niloticus (Linn). Asian Fish Aqua Sci 8:141–147Google Scholar
  35. Omitoyin BO (2006) Haematological changes in the blood of Clarias gariepinus (Burchell 1822) juveniles fed poultry litter. Livestock Res Rural Dev 18(11):23–34Google Scholar
  36. Oyawoye EO, Ogunkunle M (1998) Physiological and biochemical effects of raw Jack Beans on broilers. Pro Ann Conf Nig Soc Ani Prod 23:141–142Google Scholar
  37. Schulz C, Knaus U, Wirth M, Rennert B (2005) Effects of varying dietary fatty acid profile on growth performance, fatty acid, body and tissue composition of juvenile pike perch (Sander lucioperca) Aqua Nutr 11:1–11Google Scholar
  38. Shakoor U, Saboor A, Baig I, Afzal A, Rahman A (2015) Climate variability impacts on rice crop production in Pakistan. Pak J Agri Res 28:19–27Google Scholar
  39. Sowunmi AA (2003) Haematology of the African catfish, Clarias gariepinus (Burchell 1822) from eleyele reservoir, Ibadan, Southwest Nigeria. The Zoologist 2(1):40–44Google Scholar
  40. Talbot CJ, Bennett EM, Cassell K, Hanes DM, Minor EC, Paerl H, Raymond PA, Vargas R, Vidon PG, Wollheim W, Xenopoulos MA (2018) The impact of flooding on aquatic ecosystem services. Biogeochemistry 141:439–461CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Wedemeyer GA, Yasutake WT (1977) Clinical methods for the assessment of the effects of environmental stress on fish health. Technical papers of the US fish and wide life service no. 89. Washington, DC, US. Dept of the interior, fish and wild life service, p 180Google Scholar
  42. Zarejabad AM, Sudagar M, Pouralimotlagh S, Bastami KD (2009) Effects of rearing temperature on hematological and biochemical parameters of great sturgeon (Huso huso Linnaeus, 1758) juvenile. Comp Clin Path Clin Pathol 19(4):367–371.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s00580-009-0880-1CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Fisheries and AquacultureEbonyi State University (EBSU)AbakalikiNigeria
  2. 2.Department of Fisheries and AquacultureAlex Ekwueme Federal University, Ndufu Alike (AE-FUNAI)AbakalikiNigeria

Personalised recommendations