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Conclusion: Youth Voice in Contemporary Society

  • Julianne K. Viola
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Part of the Palgrave Studies in Young People and Politics book series (PSYPP)

Abstract

This chapter ties together and discusses the implications of the findings presented in previous chapters of the book, and also revisits the research questions. It explains how the civic habits and experiences of young people are connected to their digitally mediated lives in contemporary society. The author also discusses #NeverAgain, a social movement for strict gun control that arose after a school shooting in Parkland, Florida, as a recent example of digitally mediated civic engagement among young people. The author further presents the theoretical and educational contributions of the book, which include a new framework of civic identity in contemporary society, and recommendations for a reinvigoration of civic education to foster a greater sense of efficacy among young people. The chapter concludes with recommendations for future research, and reiterates the need for a reinvigoration of civic education, and for academics and adults to listen to the voices of young people.

Keywords

Civic engagement Civic identity framework Never Again movement Youth activism Civic education Youth political blogs 

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Julianne K. Viola
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Higher Education Research and ScholarshipImperial College LondonLondonUK

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