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Assessment of Student Engagement

  • Kayleigh O’Donnell
  • Amy L. ReschlyEmail author
Chapter
  • 22 Downloads

Abstract

The focus of this volume is on evidence-based practical strategies to enhance student engagement at school and with learning. A key element of intervention is assessment. Student engagement is ideally suited for identification of risk, linking assessment to intervention, and monitoring student progress (Reschly et al. Int J Sch Educ Psychol 2:106–114, 2014). The purpose of this chapter is to describe the assessment of academic, behavioral, and cognitive/affective engagement, with specific examples of how to assess indicators of each subtype. Research with the Student Engagement Instrument (SEI; (Appleton et al. J Sch Psychol 44:427–445, 2006)) and extensions of the SEI to elementary and college-age populations is described in detail. The chapter concludes with practical considerations and promising areas for educators in the assessment of student engagement.

Keywords

Student engagement Student engagement assessment Student engagement Instrument Assessment of engagement subtypes Engagement observation Engagement surveys 

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© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School Psychology Program, University of GeorgiaAthensUSA
  2. 2.Department of Educational PsychologyUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA

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