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School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports

  • Cody Gion
  • Heather Peshak George
  • Rhonda Nese
  • Mimi McGrath Kato
  • Michelle Massar
  • Kent McIntoshEmail author
Chapter
  • 22 Downloads

Abstract

School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (SWPBIS) is being implemented in over 23,000 (>20%) schools across the United States, and this number continues to grow. In a time where many educational initiatives are abandoned, the implementation of SWPBIS has sustained. This is due in large part to the fact that SWPBIS is not a packaged intervention or curriculum; rather, it is a framework for selecting and implementing evidence-based interventions (e.g., Check & Connect). Interventions within SWPBIS are matched to the intensity of student support needs across multiple tiers, often referred to as the continuum of supports.

Keywords

Behavior intervention School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports SWPBIS Behavioral engagement Tier 1 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cody Gion
    • 1
  • Heather Peshak George
    • 2
  • Rhonda Nese
    • 3
  • Mimi McGrath Kato
    • 4
  • Michelle Massar
    • 5
  • Kent McIntosh
    • 6
    Email author
  1. 1.Gresham-Barlow School DistrictGreshamUSA
  2. 2.Department of Child and Family StudiesUniversity South FloridaTampaUSA
  3. 3.Department of Special Education and Clinical SciencesUniversity of OregonEugeneUSA
  4. 4.Educational and Community SupportsUniversity of OregonEugeneUSA
  5. 5.Jemtegaard Middle SchoolWashougalUSA
  6. 6.Special Education, University of OregonEugeneUSA

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