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The Promotion of Family Support

  • Gloria E. MillerEmail author
  • Jessica Colebrook
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Abstract

The United Nations (1989) Convention on the Rights of the Child, the premier international childhood human rights treaty, celebrated its 25th anniversary in 2014. In this chapter, we review collaborative home, school, and community practices and programs delivered within a multi-tiered system of support that have the potential to empower families as they seek to care for and guarantee their children’s safety, protection, and potential. Cultural considerations in providing such support internationally are raised and pre-service training and professional development strategies are forwarded to ensure school psychologists are positioned to play local, national, and global roles in partnering with and supporting families to promote the ideals contained in the Convention.

Keywords

Family support Family-school consultation Collaborative partnerships Home-school involvement Family-school-community partnering School mental health School psychology 

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Child, Family, and School Psychology Program, Morgridge College of Education, University of DenverDenverUSA

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