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Indentured Servitude: The Saga of the Indians and the Chinese

  • Caf Dowlah
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Abstract

This chapter covers cross-border labor mobility focusing on indentured servitude system in the post-transatlantic slave-trade, post-African-slavery world economy. Under the revived indentured servitude system, that was geared to exploit huge reservoir of labor from the Asian continent—mainly from India and China—the European colonial powers deployed millions of indentured workers throughout their colonies around the world. Although billed as a voluntary labor system, the indentured servitude of the Asians were barely different from slavery. Often the recruitment processes were riddled with torture and deception, the contracts were hardly voluntary, and the treatment meted out to the indentured servants during the shipments and in the plantations were hardly different from slavery.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Caf Dowlah
    • 1
  1. 1.New York CityUSA

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