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Effect of the Cooling Time on the Cross Tensile Strength of the Resistance Spot Welded Medium Manganese Steel

  • Yuanfang Wang
  • Kai DingEmail author
  • Bingge Zhao
  • Yuanheng Zhang
  • Guanzhi Wu
  • Tao Wei
  • Hua Pan
  • Yulai GaoEmail author
Conference paper
  • 702 Downloads
Part of the The Minerals, Metals & Materials Series book series (MMMS)

Abstract

The effect of the cooling time between the welding pulses and post-heating pulses on the cross tensile strength (CTS) of the resistance spot welded medium manganese steel (RSW-MMS) was studied in this paper. Optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were employed to analyze the microstructure evolution. The results showed that the microstructure in nugget with cooling time of 100 ms was martensite and the microhardness could reach ~530 HV. On the contrary, the microstructure of the sample cooled for 2000 ms was tempered martensite with the microhardness of ~ 370 HV. Accordingly, the strength increased from 1.8 to 3.4 kN accompanied with the failure mode transformed from interfacial fracture (IF) to partial interfacial fracture (PIF). The improvement of the CTS for the resistance spot welded 7 Mn MMS was mainly attributed to the higher ability of the tempered martensite to prevent the crack propagation.

Keywords

Medium manganese steel Resistance spot welding Cross tensile strength Cooling time Tempered martensite 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant no. U1760102), the State Key Laboratory of Development and Application Technology of Automotive Steels (Baosteel Group), and the financial support by the Program for Professor of Special Appointment (Eastern Scholar) at Shanghai Institutions of Higher Learning.

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Copyright information

© The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yuanfang Wang
    • 1
  • Kai Ding
    • 1
    Email author
  • Bingge Zhao
    • 1
  • Yuanheng Zhang
    • 1
  • Guanzhi Wu
    • 1
  • Tao Wei
    • 1
  • Hua Pan
    • 2
    • 3
  • Yulai Gao
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Center for Advanced Solidification Technology (CAST), School of Materials Science and EngineeringShanghai UniversityShanghaiPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.State Key Laboratory of Development and Application Technology of Automotive SteelsShanghaiPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Automobile Steel Research Institute, R & D CenterBaoshan Iron & Steel CO., LTDShanghaiPeople’s Republic of China

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