Advertisement

Solid-State Diffusion Bonding of Glass-Metal for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Diagnostic Windows

  • Lee AucottEmail author
  • Rob Bamber
  • Artem Lunev
  • Tim Darby
  • Philippe Maquet
  • Nathalie Gimbert
  • Sunil Pak
  • Mike Walsh
  • Victor Udintsev
  • Glenn Eaton
  • Brendan Conway
Conference paper
  • 48 Downloads
Part of the The Minerals, Metals & Materials Series book series (MMMS)

Abstract

The United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority is involved in the design and manufacture of the diagnostic windows for ITER. ITER is an international project, with 35 nations collaborating to design, construct, and operate a prototype controlled nuclear fusion reactor in southern France. As well as providing line of sight for diagnostics, the windows also form part of the reactor primary containment boundary and are consequently classified as nuclear Safety Important Class 1 (SIC-1) components. The windows will be the first SIC-1 components in the world which are non-metallic. The current manufacturing process involves diffusion bonding a glass window to an Inconel 625 ferrule via an aluminium interlayer. This report discusses this diffusion bonding process and details the specific challenges related to component qualification for the intended nuclear SIC-1 application.

Keywords

Diffusion bonding Ceramic-metal joining Diagnostic windows Nuclear fusion ITER 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the ITER Organization through the framework contract (6000000117). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of the ITER Organization.

References

  1. 1.
    French Décret no 2012-1248 of 9th November 2012Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Décision no 2013-DC-0379 de l’ASN of 12th November 2013Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Maquet P et al (2013) Development of ITER diagnostic window assemblies. Fusion Eng Des 88(9–10):2641–2645CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Bamber R, Morrell R, Waldon C, Shannon M (2017) Design substantiation of ceramic materials on fusion reactor confinement boundaries. Fusion Eng Des 125:283–289CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    RCC-MR 2007 Design and construction rules for mechanical components of nuclear installations (2007)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    ASME boiler and pressure vessel code, Section VIII (2019)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Lunev A (2018) Determination of the composition profiles in the diffusion bond area of Ta/Al/SiO and INC625/Al/SiO joints. UKAEA internal reportGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Demers H et al (2011) Three-dimensional electron microscopy simulation with the CASINO Monte Carlo software. Scanning 33(3):135–146CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Bamber R (2019) Report proposing a route forwards for the qualification of the bonds and windows. UKAEA internal reportGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Salem J (2016) Fused silica and other transparent window materials. In: 40th international conference and expo on advanced ceramics and compositesGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Wachtman JB, Cannon WR, Matthewson MJ (2009) Mechanical properties of ceramics. Wiley, HobokenGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Wiederhorn SM (1974) Subcritical crack growth in ceramics. In Bradt RC, Hasselman DPH, Lange FF (eds) Fracture mechanics of ceramics: volume 2, microstructure, materials, and applications. Springer US, Boston, MA, pp 613–646Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lee Aucott
    • 1
    Email author
  • Rob Bamber
    • 1
  • Artem Lunev
    • 1
  • Tim Darby
    • 1
  • Philippe Maquet
    • 2
  • Nathalie Gimbert
    • 2
  • Sunil Pak
    • 3
  • Mike Walsh
    • 3
  • Victor Udintsev
    • 3
  • Glenn Eaton
    • 1
  • Brendan Conway
    • 1
  1. 1.United Kingdom Atomic Energy AuthorityCulham Science CentreAbingdonUK
  2. 2.Bertin TechnologiesAix en ProvenceFrance
  3. 3.ITER OrganizationSt. Paul Lez Durance CedexFrance

Personalised recommendations