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Policy Analyses

  • Robert G. PicardEmail author
Chapter
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Part of the Palgrave Global Media Policy and Business book series (GMPB)

Abstract

This chapter explores how policy analyses are made in preparing, promoting or analyzing policy options. It explores steps in examining issues, gathers and presents information and presents and examines alternatives and their potential outcomes. It describes the growing emphasis on evidence-based policymaking, the nature of evidence and its implications and how these inform policy-making efforts. It introduces and illustrates various analysis techniques, such as strategic analysis (SWOT analysis, the strategic triangle model, risk analysis and decision trees), environmental analysis (Delphi technique, stakeholder analysis, systems analysis), needs assessment (statistical and qualitative studies, case studies) and outcome analysis (cost-benefit analysis, financial analysis, econometric analysis).

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Suggested Readings

  1. Campbell, Harry F, and Richard P.C. Brown. 2015. Cost-Benefit Analysis. 2nd ed. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  2. Cartwright, Nancy, and Jeremy Hardie. 2012. Evidence-Based Policy: A Practical Guide to Doing It Better. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  3. Majchrzak, Ann, and M. Lynne Markus. 2013. Methods for Policy Research: Taking Socially Responsible Action, 2nd ed. London: Sage 2013.Google Scholar
  4. Swain, John W., and Kathleen Dolan Swain. 2015. Effective Writing in the Public Sector. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  5. van den Bulck, Hilde, Manuel Puppis, Karen Donders, and Leo van Audenhove, eds. 2019. The Palgrave Handbook of Methods for Media Policy Research. London: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Reuters InstituteUniversity of OxfordOxfordUK

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