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Introduction to Media and Communications Policy Studies

  • Robert G. PicardEmail author
Chapter
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Part of the Palgrave Global Media Policy and Business book series (GMPB)

Abstract

This chapter introduces the policy and policy making, explores the wide range of public intervention made under media policy, communications policy, information policy and telecommunication policy and the interactions of these approaches with security policy, infrastructure policy, industrial policy, competition policy, intellectual property policy and cultural policy. It delineates the field of media and communications policy studies, explores varying terminology to clarify terms, explains rationales for policy, introduces policy processes and stages and explores how values and norms influence policy and the use of argumentation and policy narratives in policy making.

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Suggested Readings

  1. Anderson, Charles W. 1979. The Place of Principles in Policy Analysis. The American Political Science Review 73 (3): 711–723.Google Scholar
  2. Braman, Sandra. 2004. Where has Media Policy Gone? Defining the Field in the Twenty-First Century. Communication Law and Policy 9 (2): 153–182.Google Scholar
  3. Howlett, Michael, and M. Ramesh. 2003. Studying Public Policy: Policy Cycles and Policy Subsystems. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  4. Kraft, Michael, and Scott Furlong. 2012. Public Policy: Politics Analysis, and Alternatives. Washington, DC: CQ Press.Google Scholar
  5. Picard, Robert G. 2016. Isolated and Particularised: The State of Contemporary Media and Communications Policy Research. Javnost/The Public 23 (2): 135–152.Google Scholar
  6. Picard, Robert G., and Victor S. Pickard. 2017. Essential Principles for Contemporary Media and Communications Policymaking, RISJ Report, April 2017. Oxford, Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism, University of Oxford.Google Scholar
  7. Smith, Kevin B., and Christopher W. Larimer. 2013. The Public Policy Theory Primer. Denver: Westview Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Reuters InstituteUniversity of OxfordOxfordUK

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