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“Pedagogical” Mathematics During Play at Home: An Exploratory Study

  • Ann AndersonEmail author
  • Jim Anderson
Chapter
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Abstract

This chapter provides an exploratory analysis of two play-based at-home activities for evidence of two mothers’ capacity to establish, and sustain mathematics as a goal, while addressing each child’s role throughout the event. The pedagogical tasks, Playdoh pizza and Toy cars, shed light on ways in which parent–child activity may unfold in families and underscore a need to learn more from parents about the pedagogical practices that make sense to them.

Keywords

Pedagogical tasks At-home math Play-based activity Mother-as-teacher Case study 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada

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