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Treatment of Clayey Soils with Steel Furnace Slag and Lime for Road Construction in the South West of Iran

  • Ebrahim Asghari-KaljahiEmail author
  • Zahra Hosseinzadeh
  • Hadiseh Mansouri
Conference paper
Part of the Sustainable Civil Infrastructures book series (SUCI)

Abstract

The fine-grained soils of Arvand free zone in the south west of Iran contains more than 95% fine grained particles. These soils cannot be considered as a proper material for earth works due to problems caused by clay soils such as high expansive, volumetric shrinkage, high settlement under loading and high moisture absorption. Meanwhile, there are no coarse-grained soil resources for using in the earth works around in this area. Khuzestan steel plant makes enormous amount of steel furnace slag as waste product and is available for any use. This study evaluates the treatment of fine grained soil by adding steel furnace slag and lime. For this purpose, soil was mixed with 10, 20 and 30% slag and 2, 4 and 6% hydrated lime. After curing the mixed soil, the change in soil characteristics were tested through Atterberg limits, compaction, unconfined compressive strength (UCS) and CBR tests. The test results showed that the soil plasticity and optimum moisture content decrease and maximum dry density, UCS and CBR increase by increasing slag and lime. The UCS of the soil is 147 kPa in the maximum density and is reaching to 267, 417 and 456 kPa by adding 30% slag and 2, 4 and 6% lime, respectively. The soaked CBR tests indicated that adding 20% slag and 4% lime provide a CBR more than 30%. This mixture is suitable from technical and economical views and is recommended for soil treatment of the study area and using in earth works, such road construction.

Keywords

Arvand free zone Steel slag Lime Soil treatment 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Thanks to the Jahan Ara Arvand Steel Co. and P. O. Rahvar Consulting Engineers Co. for providing information and assistance in sampling.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ebrahim Asghari-Kaljahi
    • 1
    Email author
  • Zahra Hosseinzadeh
    • 1
  • Hadiseh Mansouri
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Earth SciencesUniversity of TabrizTabrizIran

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