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Poe and Democracy’s Biopolitical Immunity

  • Rick Rodriguez
Chapter
Part of the Pivotal Studies in the Global American Literary Imagination book series (PSGALI)

Abstract

The management of a dynamic and raucous democracy, as Jacksonian democracy proved to be, resulted in the deployment of a biopolitical order capable of disciplining an intractable citizenry. This chapter reads Poe’s work as a thoughtful meditation on democracy’s somatic investment in the regulation of the lives of citizens.

Keywords

Edgar Allan Poe Romanticism Biopolitics Foucault Agamben Immunity 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rick Rodriguez
    • 1
  1. 1.Baruch CollegeNew York CityUSA

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