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Health and Safety in Brazilian Mines: A Statistical Analysis

  • Pedro Henrique Alves CamposEmail author
  • Renan Collantes Candia
  • Luciano Fernandes Magalhães
  • Pedro Benedito Casagrande
  • Gilberto Rodrigues da Silva
  • Viviane da Silva Borges Barbosa
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Series in Geomechanics and Geoengineering book series (SSGG)

Abstract

The extractive industry has always been considered one of the most dangerous for workers. However, there is a deficiency in finding updated materials that quantitatively describe work accidents in this segment of industry in Brazil. Through data provided by the Social Security, this work compares absolute numbers and other indicators of accidents and diseases in the mineral industry with data from other economic sectors. In addition, a detailed study on mining is done in order to check out specific sectors that are most responsible for these findings. The results show that the extractive industry is among the four economic sectors with respect to the highest occurrence of accidents, and is the first activity regarding mortality. The sectors which most contribute negatively to these results are the mining sectors of tin, coal, manganese and stone, sand and clay. In the study on the evolution between the years 2009 to 2016, it is observed a gradual decrease in the number of accidents and in the mortality rate of this industry in general, which indicates a greater concern of the companies on the safety and health subject.

Keywords

Work accident statistics Occupational safety Mine safety Brazilian mines 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pedro Henrique Alves Campos
    • 1
    Email author
  • Renan Collantes Candia
    • 1
  • Luciano Fernandes Magalhães
    • 1
  • Pedro Benedito Casagrande
    • 1
  • Gilberto Rodrigues da Silva
    • 1
  • Viviane da Silva Borges Barbosa
    • 1
  1. 1.Universidade Federal de Minas GeraisBelo HorizonteBrazil

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