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Afterword: The Shifting Domain of Disaster Journalism

  • Mervi PanttiEmail author
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Abstract

Media, Journalism and Disaster Communities highlights the importance of re-addressing the relationship between media and disasters when the nature of both disasters and media is changing. The different case studies demonstrate that disasters are not just news events, but in addition to impacting communities and societies, they also shape and leave traces on local media ecology. Questions about how international and national news media frame the significance and meaning of disasters and what kind of challenges disasters pose for their news reporting have been at the core of journalism studies. But questions about how local media responds to and is shaped by disasters have been less often visited. Clearly, the social role of local media after a disaster cannot be deduced from studies on national or international media.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of HelsinkiHelsinkiFinland

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