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Elements of Anthropometry

  • Francesca TosiEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Springer Series in Design and Innovation book series (SSDI, volume 2)

Abstract

Anthropometry is the science that specifically treats the measurable characters of the human body, i.e. its physical-dimensional measurements and characteristics, through the collection and statistical processing of detectable data on individuals within the different population groups. The data provided by the anthropometry relates to measurements relating to the main physical parameters of man (heights, widths, circumferences, distances of gripping and reachability, etc.) detected on a sample of individuals selected in order to represent the variability with which such measures occur within a given population. The use of anthropometric data, which presents itself as a seemingly simple process based on the identification of data useful to the project and its translation into design parameters (e.g. measures related to the stature or range of movement of the arms to define the maximum height of the shelves), on the contrary poses some problems related to the correct selection and interpretation of the available data and their use according to the design problem. The chapter covers the design applications of anthropometric data in the design field.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Architecture (DIDA)University of FlorenceFlorenceItaly

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