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Post-Soviet Migrant Memory of the Holocaust

  • Karolina Krasuska
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Abstract

This chapter focuses on literary texts by Jewish North American authors writing in English who as children or teenagers arrived from the (former) Soviet Union in the 1980s and 1990s and who have successfully carved out a niche for themselves on the American literary scene. These “post-Soviet Jewish North-American writers” are of the same age cohort as the generation producing canonical third-generation Holocaust narratives. Yet the presence of Holocaust postmemory in their writing is in stark contrast to such writers as Nicole Krauss, Jonathan Safran Foer, and Nathan Englander. In David Bezmozgis’s, Lara Vapnyar’s, and Boris Fishman’s work, this contrast stems from the different modes of memory and postmemory punctuating their texts. In their often autobiographical novels, short stories, and graphic memoirs, these writers produce a new mode of Holocaust postmemory that is inflected by their immigrant positioning and Soviet memory.

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© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karolina Krasuska
    • 1
  1. 1.University of WarsawWarsawPoland

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