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Christian Relational Virtues: Hospitability, Compassion, and Solidarity

  • Mary Mee-Yin Yuen
Chapter
Part of the Religion and Global Migrations book series (RGM)

Abstract

In this chapter, Yuen examines some relational virtues that are critical in building relationships between local people and the marginalized, which, in turn, can sustain commitment to social concerns and the common good. She first examines the meanings and functions of justice, as a cardinal virtue, in guiding relationships with individuals, the relationship between societies and their individual members, and the relationships of individuals to the larger society and world community. Then, she discusses the meanings and practices of three interrelated Christian virtues—hospitality, compassion, and solidarity, through which the virtue of justice can be thickened. She offers some examples of virtuous practices or moral actions pertaining to each virtue. She also discusses the importance of the virtue of charity and the virtue of prudence in guiding Christians to love tenderly, to act justly, and to walk humbly with God and the migrants, our neighbors.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary Mee-Yin Yuen
    • 1
  1. 1.Holy Spirit Seminary College of Theology and PhilosophyHong KongHong Kong

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