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Migration, Human Rights, and Obligations

  • Mary Mee-Yin Yuen
Chapter
Part of the Religion and Global Migrations book series (RGM)

Abstract

In this chapter, Yuen offers an in-depth examination of the characteristics of the Catholic human rights theory. In spite of the problems of the rights language, Yuen argues that it is still a useful one for evaluating a society’s social practices in protecting its people, including migrants and other underprivileged, from discrimination and inhuman treatment. She also tries to answer some of the puzzles raised by various scholars. Based on the social encyclicals, Yuen explores thoroughly the distinctive features of the Catholic rights discourse that are different from the Western liberal tradition, such as a social self with a communitarian nature, a correlation of rights and duties, and the emphasis on solidarity and the common good. At the end of the chapter, she assesses the strengths and limitations of the rights language regarding building solidarity with the migrants.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary Mee-Yin Yuen
    • 1
  1. 1.Holy Spirit Seminary College of Theology and PhilosophyHong KongHong Kong

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