Advertisement

Implementation Aspects of ProNet 4.0

  • Reinhard GotzheinEmail author
Chapter
  • 123 Downloads
Part of the Computer Communications and Networks book series (CCN)

Abstract

In this chapter, we outline Black burst integrated Protocol Stack (BiPS) [2, 3], a real-time-capable implementation framework specifically devised for the protocols of ProNet 4.0 [1], and its implementation on the Imote2 [15] hardware platform.

Literature

Chair for Networked Systems

  1. 1.
    Gotzhein R (2014) ProNet 4.0—a wireless real-time communication system for industry 4.0. White Paper, Networked Systems Group, Department of Computer Science, University of Kaiserslautern. http://vs.informatik.uni-kl.de/publications/2014/Go14/whitePaperEN-ProNet4.0.pdf. Last accessed 27 Aug 2019
  2. 2.
    Christmann D, Braun T, Engel M, Gotzhein R (2016) BiPS—a real-time-capable protocol framework for wireless sensor networks. In: Proceedings of the 6th international conference on pervasive and embedded computing (PEC 2016), Lisbon, Portugal, 25–27 Jul 2016, pp 17–27Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Engel M, Kramer C, Braun T, Christmann D, Gotzhein R (2019) BiPS—a real-time-capable protocol framework for wireless networked control systems and its application. In: Obaidat M, Cabello E (eds) E-business and telecommunications (ICETE 2017), communications in computer and information science, vol 990. Springer, pp 313–336Google Scholar

Further References

  1. 4.
    Basmer T, Schomann H, Peter S (2011) Implementation analysis of the IEEE 802.15.4 MAC for wireless sensor networks. In: International conference on selected topics in mobile and wireless networking. Shanghai, ChinaGoogle Scholar
  2. 5.
    Chipcon AS (2019) CC2420 ZigBee-ready RF transceiver. http://www-inst.eecs.berkeley.edu/~cs150/Documents/CC2420.pdf. Last accessed 27 Aug 2019
  3. 6.
    Dunkels A, Gronvall B, Voigt T (2004) Contiki—a lightweight and flexible operating system for tiny networked sensors. In: 29th annual IEEE international conference on local computer networks, pp 455–462Google Scholar
  4. 7.
    Eswaran A, Rowe A, Rajkumar R (2005) Nano-rk: an energy-aware resource-centric RTOS for sensor networks. In: 26th IEEE international real-time systems symposium (RTSS 2005), pp 10–265Google Scholar
  5. 8.
    Farooq MO, Kunz T (2011) Operating systems for wireless sensor networks: a survey. Sensors 11(6):5900–5930CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 9.
    FreeRTOS—Free real-time operating system. https://www.freertos.org/. Last accessed 27 Aug 2019
  7. 10.
    Gilani MHS, Sarrafi I, Abbaspour M (2013) An adaptive CSMA/TDMA hybrid MAC for energy and throughput improvement of wireless sensor networks. Ad Hoc Netw 11(4):1297–1304CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 11.
    Hahm O, Baccelli R, Günes M, Wählisch M, Schmidt TC (2013) RIOT OS—towards an OS for the internet of things. In: The 32nd IEEE international conference on computer communications (INFOCOM 2013), Turin, Italy, 14–19 Apr 2013Google Scholar
  9. 12.
    Harvan M, Schönwälder J (2008) TinyOS motes on the internet: IPv6 over 802.15.4 (6lowpan), Praxis der Informationsverarbeitung und Kommunikation 31(4):244–251Google Scholar
  10. 13.
    Hsieh TH, Lin KY, Wang PC (2015) A hybrid MAC protocol for wireless sensor networks. In: 12th IEEE international conference on networking, sensing and control, pp 93–98Google Scholar
  11. 14.
    [IEEE 802.15.4] Institute of electrical and electronics engineers. IEEE standard 802 part 15.4: low-rate wireless personal area networks (LR-WPANs). IEEE Computer Society, New York, USA, Sep 2011Google Scholar
  12. 15.
    MEMSIC Inc.: Imote 2 datasheet. https://vs.cs.uni-kl.de/downloads/Imote2NET_ED_Datasheet.pdf. Last accessed 27 Aug 2019
  13. 16.
    International electrotechnical commission: industrial communication networks—wireless communication network and communication profiles—ISA 100.11a (IEC 62734 ed 1.0), Geneva, Switzerland, Mar 2012Google Scholar
  14. 17.
    Olempia KJ, Pandeeswaran C, Natarajan P (2016) A survey on energy efficient contention based and hybrid MAC protocols for wireless sensor networks. Indian J Sci Technol 9(12)Google Scholar
  15. 18.
    Priya B, Manohar SS (2013) EE-MAC: energy efficient hybrid MAC for WSN. In: Int J Distrib Sensor Netw 9(12)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 19.
    Rhee I, Warrier A, Aia M, Min J, Sichitiu ML (2008) Z-MAC: a hybrid MAC for wireless sensor networks. In: IEEE/ACM Trans Netw 16(3):511–524Google Scholar
  17. 20.
    Silva R, Silva JS, Boavida F (2009) Evaluating 6LowPAN implementations in WSNs. In: 9th Conferencia sobre Redes de Computadores Oeiras, PortugalGoogle Scholar
  18. 21.
    Sitanayah L, Sreenan CJ, Brown KN (2010) Emergency response MAC protocol (ER-MAC) for wireless sensor networks. In: Abdelzaher TF, Voigt T, Wolisz A (eds) 9th International conference on information processing in sensor networks (IPSN 2010), Stockholm, SwedenGoogle Scholar
  19. 22.
    International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Industrial Communication Networks—Wireless Communication Network and Communication Profiles - WirelessHART (IEC 62591 ed 1.0), Geneva, Switzerland, April 2010Google Scholar
  20. 23.
    ZigBee™ Alliance: ZigBee specification, version 1.0, June 2005. www.zigbee.org, 378 p. Last accessed 27 Aug 2019

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Chair for Networked SystemsTechnische Universität KaiserslauternKaiserslauternGermany

Personalised recommendations