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From “English as a Native Language” to English as a Lingua Franca: Instructional Effects on Japanese University Students’ Attitudes Towards English

  • Mayu KonakaharaEmail author
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Abstract

This chapter explores how Japanese university students (un)change their attitudes towards English and English communication through academic content courses which were designed to inform the perspective of English as a lingua franca (ELF) by conducting a qualitative analysis of the students’ voices. The present data are the students’ written documents collected at the beginning, in the middle, and at the end of the semester. The analysis revealed a positive impact of the ELF-informed instruction on the students’ attitudes towards English. Although many of the students evaluated their own English negatively at the outset of the semester, their attitudes were gradually transformed to more ELF-oriented through the instruction, they thereby gradually expressing equality among varieties of English, an increased sense of confidence in their English, and the importance of mutual intelligibility through accommodation. The analysis also revealed key factors in transforming their attitudes.

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research is supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientists (B) JP17K13508.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of EnglishKanda University of International StudiesChiba-ShiJapan

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