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Introduction

  • Eduardo D. FaingoldEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter presents the issues, themes, and goals of the book, and provides an outline of the chapters in the book.

Keywords

European Union Language rights Language policy Language minorities 

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Language and LiteratureThe University of TulsaTulsaUSA

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