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“Let There Be LEGO!”: An Introduction to Cultural Studies of LEGO

  • Sharon R. MazzarellaEmail author
  • Rebecca C. Hains
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter, Mazzarella and Hains introduce the reader to the history, evolution and expansion of the LEGO brand over the past 80+ years. The authors then briefly situate this book within the broader field of Cultural Studies before introducing each of the chapters that follow.

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Communication StudiesJames Madison UniversityHarrisonburgUSA
  2. 2.Department of Media and CommunicationSalem State UniversitySalemUSA

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